February 17, 2020
News

Serious issues concerning mother and child safety at St Luke’s Hospital in Kilkenny: report

St Luke’s General Hospital was found to have particularly high levels of non-compliance with standards in its maternity unit.

Among the problems identified during the Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA) inspection at the Kilkenny hospital were care for the patients and their babies, governance issues, leadership and management issues.

A follow-up audit performed last September by HIQA found the issues surrounding the care for mothers and their babies still exist, but work has been done to improve other areas.

The initial inspections by HIQA began in August 2019 and St Luke’s was revisited in September 2019 for a follow-on inspection.

Out of 25 areas of focus on the obstetrics department within St Luke’s the hospital was found to be non-compliant in six areas.

These six areas in which St Luke’s fell down were providing care known to achieve safe, high-quality outcomes for women and their babies; provide an environment which supports the delivery of safe, high-quality care and protects the health and wellbeing of women and their babies; provide formalised governance arrangements for assuring the delivery of safe, high-quality maternity care; effective management arrangements to support and promote the delivery of safe, high-quality maternity services; plan, organize and manage their workforce to achieve the service objectives for safe, high-quality maternity care; and support their workforce in delivering safe, high-quality maternity care.

St Luke’s was found to be only partially compliant in a further two areas – to protect women and their babies from the risk of avoidable harm through the appropriate design and delivery of maternity services; ensure their workforce has the competencies and training required to deliver safe, high-quality maternity care.

HIQA returned to St Luke’s in September last year to see if the instructions provided to the hospital had been taken on board and found that things had improved greatly with just two areas then being non-complaint – providing care known to achieve safe, high-quality outcomes for women and their babies; provide an environment which supports the delivery of safe, high-quality care and protects the health and wellbeing of women and their babies.

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